Worrying study finds half of parents ignore medical advice and let kids under 14 booze at home

Worrying-study-finds-half-of-parents-ignore-medical-advice-and-let-kids-under-14-booze-at-home

Half of parents with children aged under 14 allows them to drink alcohol at home against guidance from the Chief Medical Officer.

More than one in ten parents with children aged five to seven allows them to drink alcohol in the home, while some even let them drink every day according to a survey of more than 1,000 parents.

More than half of parents with children aged 16-17 lets them drink alcohol at home, with around one in ten letting them do so on a weekly basis.

It is not illegal for a child aged five to 16 to drink alcohol at home or on other private premises.

However, the Chief Medical Officer’s report into the consumption of alcohol by children highlights those that drink under 14 have increased health risks, including alcohol-related injuries, involvement in violence and suicidal attempts.

According to a survey carried out on behalf of Churchill Home Insurance, of those parents who allow their children to consume alcohol in the home around a quarter does so because they see nothing wrong with their children drinking alcohol.

Nearly a third said allowing them to drink in the home allows them to monitor their child’s alcohol consumption.

One in seven parents has seen their child have an accident while under the influence of alcohol in their home.

One in twenty parents has witnessed their child sustain a serious injury, such as a broken bone or concussion, as a result of their child consuming alcohol, while 8% has seen their offspring suffer a minor injury such as a cut or bruise.

Dr Sarah Jarvis, medical advisor to alcohol education charity Drinkaware, who was not able to comment directly on the findings, said: The health risks associated with underage drinking include the possibility of brain and liver damage, increased risk of accident and injury, potential for lower educational attainment, increased risk of being involved in violence and increased likelihood of ending up in vulnerable or dangerous situations.

It’s best to talk to your child about the risks associated with drinking. As a parent, you have more influence than you might think.

“Your child is likely to come to you first for information and advice about alcohol, and you can help shape their attitudes and behaviour towards alcohol by being a role model for responsible drinking.

However, despite the dangers for young people of drinking it may be better for them to do so with parents’ knowledge.

Statistics compiled by Drinkaware show that those who drink unsupervised are more likely to suffer alcohol harm.

They found that 40% of those who drunk unsupervised had a bad experience, whether it be missing a day of school, getting into trouble with the police or being taken to hospital, just 8% of the group who have always had adult supervision had the same bad experiences.

News Source MirrorNews

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