Chilling photo shows endangered wildlife pulled out from inside stomach of just ONE feral cat

Chilling photo shows endangered wildlife pulled out from inside stomach of just ONE feral cat

A chilling photo has captured the gruesome reality of what is found inside the stomach of an average feral cat.

Researchers cut open a cat’s stomach to discover dozens of mammals, lizards and even snakes – all eaten in the final 24 hours of the animal’s life.

In the photo, sent out by the University of Queensland on Monday, the enormous number of animals devoured by the cat are laid bare, strewn across a table next to the dead feline.

Researchers cut open a cat’s stomach to discover dozens of mammals, lizards and even snakes – all eaten in the final 24 hours of the animal’s life (pictured)

The confronting photo shows dozens of mice, lizards and other small reptiles cut from the cat’s stomach, all barely digested.

Threatened Species Recovery Hub researcher John Woinarski said his team had dissected more than 10,000 feral cats to examine the ‘cat scat’.

From those 10,000 cats, they estimated which animals were falling prey to wild cats, and at what rates.

‘Killing cats then pulling apart their digestive tracts, it’s not the funnest job in the world by any means. But it’s a very valid means to get a good idea of their diet,’ Mr Woinarski told the Sydney Morning Herald. 

Threatened Species Recovery Hub researcher John Woinarski said his team had dissected more than 10,000 feral cats to examine the ‘cat scat’ (feral cat pictured)

The confronting photo shows dozens of mice, lizards and other small reptiles cut from the cat’s stomach, all barely digested (pictured)

Threatened Species Recovery Hub researchers said the number of reptiles killed by feline predators now eclipsed the number of birds they killed each year.

The NESP revealed cats killed more than a million birds each day in Australia, but this year announced there were 1.8 million reptiles falling victim every day.

NESP Lead author Mr Woinarski said cats were wreaking devastation on native marsupials and reptiles.

‘The reptile species we’re most worried about cat predation for, are the relatively large, slow-moving, long-lived species that live on the ground,’ he said.

‘Things like blue tongues, shinglebacks, frilled-neck lizards, thorny devils … a whole group of those are probably declining, largely due to cat predation.’

The researchers found about 250 Australian reptiles were being killed by feral cats, 10 of which were listed as a threatened species.

There are between two and six million feral cats in the country, threatening Australia’s wildlife.

The NESP revealed cats killed more than a million birds each day in Australia, but this year announced there were 1.8 million reptiles falling victim every day

News Source DailyMailsNews

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