A neighbor’s word can bring death sentence in Iraq IS…

A neighbor's word can bring death sentence in Iraq IS...

BAGHDAD (AP) – Death sentences are being issued at a dizzying rate in Iraq’s rush to prosecute and punish suspected members of the Islamic State group, with more than 3,000 handed out over just the past few years.

About 250 people condemned for alleged IS ties have been hanged since 2014, including 101 only last year.

Any allegation of having taken up arms for the militant group can bring the ultimate penalty, even while the evidence is thin and cursory.

In this May 30, 2018 photo, Hind Zaki, the wife of death row prisoner Ismail Saleh and his mother, right, pose with his portrait at their home in Mosul, Iraq. The couple’s daughter Safaa, left, did not meet her father before he was sentenced to death by an Iraqi court. raq’s courts are issuing death sentences at a dizzying rate against accused members of the Islamic State group, after swift trials with little evidence presented. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

The heavy reliance on informants is particularly glaring, given the potential that some are motivated by personal grudges.

Thousands of defendants are pushed through the courts at a rapid clip, with individual trials as short as 10 or 15 minutes and a third of the cases ending in the death penalty.

In this May 29, 2018 photo, Umm Quteiba poses for a portrait with a picture of of her son, death row prisoner Quteiba Younis, at their home near Mosul, Iraq. Younis was 16 when the Islamic State group overran northern Iraq, including his home village of Areij, just outside Mosul. A typical teenager, he was into PlayStation and was just starting to get interested in cars. He swam in the Tigris River every day to escape the summer heat. Now 20, he has been sentenced to death for allegedly being an IS fighter, a charge he denies. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 30, 2018, photo, Hamdah poses for a portrait with her son, Ahmed Nijm, a death row prisoner, at their home in Hamam Ali, Iraq. He was sentenced to death in a Baghdad court on April 19 for ties to the Islamic State group. After the session, he saw his mother at the courthouse for the first time in the 11 months since his arrest. We were both crying. We did not say much and the guards told me to leave, his mother said, her blue eyes tearing up. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 29, 2018, photo, the son of death row prisoner Ismail Saleh looks at a portrait of his father at their home in Mosul, Iraq. Now Saleh sits on death row in Baghdad, sentenced to hang for allegedly being an Islamic State group fighter, a charge he denies. The only evidence against him The word of a neighbor. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018 photo, a guard leads three death row prisoners Quteiba Younis, left, Ahmed Nijim, center, and Ismail Saleh, right, to the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad, Iraq. The Associated Press spoke to three Iraqis sentenced to death for allegedly being fighters for the Islamic State group, as well as to their families in and around the northern city of Mosul. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018, photo, death row prisoner Ismail Saleh is led to a room for an interview with The Associated Press at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad. In the background are photos of his fellow prisoners, nearly 400 mugshots of men sentenced to death, with a sign declaring, The Achievements of the Intelligence Eagles’ Cell. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this Sunday, May 27, 2018 photo, death row prisoner Ismail Saleh shows an injury during an interview with The Associated Press at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad. He has been sentenced to death by hanging for alleged association with the Islamic State group, a charge he denies. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 29, 2018, photo, children of death row prisoner Ismail Saleh listen to a message he recorded for them at their home in Mosul, Iraq. I don’t even know if any of my children know that I have been sentenced to death, he said. A Baghdad court in December of 2017 ordered him to die by hanging for alleged ties to the Islamic State group. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018, photo, death row prisoner Ismail Saleh poses for a portrait at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad. Sometimes I wake up and for a moment I feel that this death sentence and me being here is just a bad dream, the 29-year-old told The Associated Press in an interview in a Baghdad prison. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018, photo, a guard sits in the foyer of the offices of Iraq’s primary counterterrorism agency, the Eagles’ Cell, where the walls are lined with nearly 400 mugshots of men sentenced to death, in Baghdad, Iraq. A sign declareswld, The Achievements of the Intelligence Eagles’ Cell. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018 photo, death row prisoner Quteiba Younis smokes as he poses for a portrait at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad, Iraq. The worst time in prison is sunset, Younis says. It reminds him of the home he may never see again because back in his hometown in the summer, sunset was the most romantic moment, when the days’ punishing heat eases. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018, photo, death row prisoner Quteiba Younis speaks with The Associated Press as a guard, right, stands by, at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad, Iraq. Younis was 16 when the Islamic State group overran northern Iraq, including his home village of Areij, just outside Mosul. Now 20, he has been sentenced to death for allegedly being an IS fighter, a charge he denies. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018, photo, death row prisoner Quteiba Younis, 20, poses for a portrait at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad. His family fled Areij as Iraqi forces battled to retake the territory in 2017, settling into a camp for the displaced, where federal police arrested Younis in February. Younis said he was beaten, tortured with electric shocks and hung upside down, finally confessing to crimes he hadn’t committed to end his torment. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

This May 27, 2018 photo, shows a display of nearly 400 mugshots of men sentenced to death, with a sign declaring, The Achievements of the Intelligence Eagles’ Cell, in the foyer of the offices’ of Iraq’s primary counterterrorism agency, the Eagles’ Cell in Baghdad, Iraq. Iraq’s courts are issuing death sentences at a dizzying rate against accused members of the Islamic State group, after swift trials with little evidence presented. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018 photo, death row prisoner Ahmed Nijm speaks with The Associated Press at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad. An investigating officer who knew of Nijm’s case said a witness identified Nijm as an Islamic State fighter. Nijm said that during interrogation, he was beaten and threatened with electrical shocks. My body is too weak for torture, he said. So I confessed to having joined Daesh for a month. He was sentenced to death in a Baghdad court on April 19. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018 photo, death row prisoner Ahmed Nijm poses for a portrait at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad. He was sentenced on April 19, 2018, for membership in the Islamic State group. I hope death comes to me when I am on my prayer rug, Nijm says. If I have been oppressed, then God will bring me justice. At the end I would rather die as the oppressed, not the oppressor. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018 photo, death row prisoner Ahmed Nijm is led to an interview with The Associated Press at the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad, Iraq. The Islamic State group, Nijm says, came to Mosul in an earnest, sincere search for justice. Nijm says the militants were loved by the people at first, and they brought better security in the streets, reduced corruption and lowered food prices in a city that had suffered chaos and lawlessness in the years since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. But despite his admiration for the strict beliefs of IS, he insisted he was never a member of the group. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

This May 27, 2018 photo, shows photos in the foyer of the offices’ of Iraq’s primary counterterrorism agency, the Eagles’ Cell in Baghdad, where the walls are lined with nearly 400 mugshots of men sentenced to death, with a sign declaring, The Achievements of the Intelligence Eagles’ Cell. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 27, 2018 photo, a guard leads three death row prisoners Ismail Saleh, left, Ahmed Nijm, center, and Quteiba Younis, right, to the Eagles’ Cell counterterrorism intelligence office in Baghdad. The Associated Press spoke to the three Iraqis sentenced to death for allegedly being fighters for the Islamic State group, as well as to their families in and around the northern city of Mosul. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

In this May 23, 2018 photo, suspected Islamic State militants wait their turn for sentencing at the counterterrorism court in Baghdad, Iraq. Death sentences are being issued at a dizzying rate in Iraq’s rush to prosecute and punish suspected members of the Islamic State group, with more than 3,000 handed out over just the past few years. Any allegation of having taken up arms for the militant group can bring the ultimate penalty, even while the evidence is thin and cursory. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

This May 24, 2018 courtroom sketch shows Iraq’s counterterrorism court where suspected Islamic State militants are tried. Death sentences are being issued at a dizzying rate in Iraq’s rush to prosecute and punish suspected members of the Islamic State group, with more than 3,000 handed out over just the past few years. Any allegation of having taken up arms for the militant group can bring the ultimate penalty, even while the evidence is thin and cursory. (AP Photo/Saif Jawadi)

EDS NOTE GRAPHIC CONTENT – FILE – This file photo released by Iraq’s Ministry of Justice June 29, 2018, shows four men hanging in the gallows in Iraq. Death sentences are being issued at a dizzying rate in Iraq’s rush to prosecute and punish suspected members of the Islamic State group, with more than 3,000 handed out over just the past few years. Any allegation of having taken up arms for the militant group can bring the ultimate penalty, even while the evidence is thin and cursory. (Iraq Ministry of Justice via AP, File)

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